Excavated

Posted: August 25th, 2021 | Filed under: Out Of Town

It is astonishing how much stuff has been excavated from the Templo Mayor site:

Museo del Templo Mayor, Centro Histórico, Mexico City/Ciudad de México, Mexico, August 20, 2021

Templo Mayor, Centro Histórico, Mexico City/Ciudad de México, Mexico, August 20, 2021

Museo del Templo Mayor, Centro Histórico, Mexico City/Ciudad de México, Mexico, August 20, 2021

Skull Masks, Museo del Templo Mayor, Centro Histórico, Mexico City/Ciudad de México, Mexico, August 20, 2021

Museo del Templo Mayor, Centro Histórico, Mexico City/Ciudad de México, Mexico, August 20, 2021

The museum itself is impressive, too, with a big central atrium highlighting artifacts and panoramic views of the site:

Museo del Templo Mayor, Centro Histórico, Mexico City/Ciudad de México, Mexico, August 20, 2021

Museo del Templo Mayor, Centro Histórico, Mexico City/Ciudad de México, Mexico, August 20, 2021

Templo Mayor Site From Museo del Templo Mayor, Centro Histórico, Mexico City/Ciudad de México, Mexico, August 20, 2021

We had lunch at nearby El Taquito, an institution, which was great:

El Taquito, Centro Histórico, Mexico City/Ciudad de México, Mexico, August 20, 2021

Cecina de Oaxaca, El Taquito, Centro Histórico, Mexico City/Ciudad de México, Mexico, August 20, 2021

El Taquito, Centro Histórico, Mexico City/Ciudad de México, Mexico, August 20, 2021

El Taquito is located on Calle del Carmen, one of several streets in the Centro Histórico that pull triple duty as pedestrian mall, market and vehicular thoroughfare — chaotic and amazing at the same time:
Calle del Carmen, Centro Histórico, Mexico City/Ciudad de México, Mexico, August 20, 2021
Calle del Carmen, Centro Histórico, Mexico City/Ciudad de México, Mexico, August 20, 2021

A Day In Coyoacán

Posted: August 25th, 2021 | Filed under: Out Of Town

Coyoacán is a bit of a hike, so if you’re heading down to the Frida Kahlo Museum, it will probably end up being the whole afternoon. The museum/house is charming, befitting the whimsical vibe of the artist, and the house itself is beautiful, with lush gardens and striking blue paint everywhere.

Museo Frida Kahlo, Londres 247, Coyoacán, Mexico City/Ciudad de México, Mexico, August 19, 2021

Museo Frida Kahlo, Coyoacán, Mexico City/Ciudad de México, Mexico, August 19, 2021

Museo Frida Kahlo, Coyoacán, Mexico City/Ciudad de México, Mexico, August 19, 2021

Museo Frida Kahlo, Coyoacán, Mexico City/Ciudad de México, Mexico, August 19, 2021

Museo Frida Kahlo, Coyoacán, Mexico City/Ciudad de México, Mexico, August 19, 2021

The nearby market, Mercado 89 Coyoacán, is fun and has some good stuff:

Mercado 89 Coyoacán, Coyoacán, Mexico City/Ciudad de México, Mexico, August 19, 2021

Jardín Centenario is a pleasant, picturesque spot in the center of the neighborhood:

Fuente de los Coyotes, Jardín Centenario, Coyoacán, Mexico City/Ciudad de México, Mexico, August 19, 2021

A fun little Sanborn’s opens out into the park:

Sanborn's, Jardín Centenario 17, Coyoacán, Mexico City/Ciudad de México, Mexico, August 19, 2021

Sanborn's, Jardín Centenario 17, Coyoacán, Mexico City/Ciudad de México, Mexico, August 19, 2021

Also, on the park, lunch at the lovely and yummy Corazón de Maguey:

Corazón de Maguey, Coyoacán, Mexico City/Ciudad de México, Mexico, August 19, 2021

Enchiladas Tres Colores, Corazón de Maguey, Coyoacán, Mexico City/Ciudad de México, Mexico, August 19, 2021

Mexico’s National Museum of Anthropology

Posted: August 24th, 2021 | Filed under: Out Of Town

The Museo Nacional de Antropología in the Bosque de Chapultepec is a 22-hall behemoth of an institution with the modest goal of detailing the archaeological and anthropological history of Mexico from the migration of humans into the Americas to the present. As such, it is expansive and there is a lot to take in, but it’s also a pleasant building, with a seriously impressive fountain, Paraguas (“umbrella”), in the courtyard and lovely gardens adjoining each of the halls that contain artifacts and replicas and which are a nice break from hermetically sealed museum-world:

Paraguas, Museo Nacional de Antropología/National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico City/Ciudad de México, Mexico, August 17, 2021

Temple of the Feathered Serpent, Teotihuacán Hall, Museo Nacional de Antropología/National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico City/Ciudad de México, Mexico, August 17, 2021

Teotihuacán Model, Museo Nacional de Antropología/National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico City/Ciudad de México, Mexico, August 17, 2021

Maya Hall, Museo Nacional de Antropología/National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico City/Ciudad de México, Mexico, August 17, 2021

Museo Nacional de Antropología/National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico City/Ciudad de México, Mexico, August 17, 2021

The Mexica Hall sits at the head of the table, and is the centerpiece of the lower-level archaeology halls:

Mexica Hall, Museo Nacional de Antropología/National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico City/Ciudad de México, Mexico, August 17, 2021

The Mexica are better known as the Aztecs, but that name isn’t accurate, though this is the famous Aztec Sun Stone, which, the interpretive information says, is not actually a calendar:

Aztec Sun Stone, Mexica Hall, Museo Nacional de Antropología/National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico City/Ciudad de México, Mexico, August 17, 2021

Here are some temple offerings:

Mexica Hall, Museo Nacional de Antropología/National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico City/Ciudad de México, Mexico, August 17, 2021

The second floor is devoted to the anthropological side of the story, as opposed to the archaeological record, and details the various folkways:

Ethnography Halls, Museo Nacional de Antropología/National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico City/Ciudad de México, Mexico, August 17, 2021

Even if you’re running out of steam, the second floor is nice to at least wander through:

Ethnography Halls, Museo Nacional de Antropología/National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico City/Ciudad de México, Mexico, August 17, 2021